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Wikipedia:Today's featured list/May 2021

Wikipedia:Today's featured list/May 2021


May 3

Phyllis Newman
Phyllis Newman

The Isabelle Stevenson Award is a non-competitive philanthropic award presented as part of the Tony Awards to "recognize an individual from the theatre community who has made a substantial contribution of volunteered time and effort on behalf of one or more humanitarian, social service or charitable organizations, regardless of whether such organizations relate to the theatre." It is named in honor of Isabelle Stevenson, a dancer who performed for audiences around the world and was president and later chairperson of the board of the American Theatre Wing until her death in 2003. The American Theatre Wing and The Broadway League present the winner with a copy of a circular brass and bronze medallion designed by art director Herman Rosse at an annual award ceremony in New York City. The award has been presented annually since the 63rd Tony Awards in 2009. Actress Phyllis Newman (pictured) was chosen as its inaugural recipient for her work in establishing the Phyllis Newman Women's Health Initiative in 1995 and raising $3.5 million for the organization. Since then, another five women and five men have received the award and no one has won it more than once. (Full list...)


May 7

Pontypridd Bridge
Pontypridd Bridge

There are three Grade I listed buildings in Rhondda Cynon Taf, a county borough in South Wales. In the United Kingdom, the term listed building refers to a building or other structure officially designated as being of special architectural, historical, or cultural significance. Listing was begun by a provision in the Town and Country Planning Act 1947. In Wales, authority for listing or delisting, under the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990, rests with the Welsh ministers, though these decisions are based on the recommendations of Cadw. The Grade I buildings are a mid-18th-century bridge (pictured) in Pontypridd, and two structures related to the coal-mining heritage of the region: the engine house (1875) and the headframe (1902) of the Hetty Pit near Hopkinstown. The growth of iron foundries in Merthyr Tydfil led to the building of the Glamorganshire Canal (1791–1795) and the Taff Vale Railway (1841) to connect the industry to the docks at Cardiff; both of these passed through Pontypridd, contributing to its development into a major market town. (Full list...)


May 10

UEFA Cup Winners' Cup finals concluded a seasonal association-football competition contested between member associations of European football's governing body, the Union of European Football Associations (UEFA). It was open to winners of domestic cup winners, such as the English FA Cup champions. Throughout its 39-year history, the UEFA Cup Winners' Cup was always a knock-out tournament with two-legged home and away ties until the single-match final, which was staged at a neutral venue; the only exception to this was the two-legged final in the competition's first year. The first competition was won by Fiorentina, from Italy, who defeated Scotland's Rangers 4–1 over two legs to win the 1961 final. Barcelona are the most successful club in the competition's history, having won it on four occasions. The competition was abolished in 1999; the Italian team Lazio were the last team to win it when they beat Mallorca 2–1. (Full list...)


May 14

Snake River near Twin Falls, Idaho
Snake River near Twin Falls, Idaho

A total of seventy streams that are at least 50 miles (80 km) long flow through the U.S. state of Idaho. All of these streams originate in the United States except the Kootenai River (third-longest) and the Moyie River (thirty-first-longest), both of which begin in the Canadian province of British Columbia. At 1,076 miles (1,732 km), the Snake River (pictured) is the longest, and the only stream of more than 500 miles (800 km) in total length. It begins in Wyoming and flows through Idaho for 769 miles (1,238 km), and then through Oregon and Washington. All but four of the streams lie within the large basin of the Columbia River, although the river itself does not flow through Idaho. Consequently, the predominant direction of the state's streamflow is northwest towards the Columbia River and its mouth at the Pacific Ocean. (Full list...)


May 17

Adèle Exarchopoulos
Adèle Exarchopoulos

The 2013 French romantic coming-of-age drama film Blue Is the Warmest Colour garnered awards and nominations in a variety of categories. In the film, Adèle Exarchopoulos (pictured) stars as a teenager who falls in love with an older woman played by Léa Seydoux. The film premiered at the 66th Cannes Film Festival in May 2013, where it won the Palme d'Or. For the first time, the jury at Cannes presented the award to three recipients: director Abdellatif Kechiche, Exarchopoulos, and Seydoux. At the age of 19, Exarchopoulos became the youngest recipient of the award. At the 39th César Awards, the film received eight nominations, including Best Film, Best Director for Kechiche, and Best Actress for Seydoux. Exarchopoulos was the sole winner for Most Promising Actress. (Full list...)


May 21

BrevetMedal.jpg

The Marine Corps Brevet Medal, also known as the Brevet Medal, was a military decoration of the United States Marine Corps; it was created in 1921 as a result of Marine Corps Order No. 26. The decoration was a one-time issuance and retroactively recognized living Marine Corps officers who had received a brevet rank. Brevet promotions were used by the United States military in some capacity from 1775 until they were discontinued in 1900. The Army was the only branch authorized to grant brevets until 1814, when the Marine Corps was granted the same privilege. For the 86 years, the Marine Corps awarded 121 brevet promotions to 100 Marine Corps officers. Captain Anthony Gale was the first to receive a brevet promotion in 1814, and John Twiggs Myers, who died in 1952, was the last surviving recipient. In 1921 John A. Lejeune, Commandant of the Marine Corps, requested that a Marine Corps Brevet Medal be authorized; after it was approved and created, the decoration was given to the last 20 living Marine Corps officers who received brevet promotions. (Full list...)


May 24

Johnny Winter
Johnny Winter

The discography of Johnny Winter, an American rock and blues musician, dates to the period from 1959 to 1967, when he recorded several singles for mostly small record companies in his native Texas. In 1968, Johnny Winter completed his first album, The Progressive Blues Experiment, and in 1969, he was signed to Columbia Records. With the label, Winter had his greatest success on the main American record chart; Johnny Winter (1969), Second Winter (1969), Live Johnny Winter And (1971), and Still Alive and Well (1973) all reached the top forty on the Billboard 200 album chart. Beginning in 1973, Winter's music was issued by Blue Sky Records, a Columbia custom label. At Blue Sky, Winter also became a producer and was responsible for releases by Chicago blues pioneer Muddy Waters. In the years after 1984, Winter changed record companies several times, never remaining with any one for more than three albums. Throughout his career, Winter's recording catalogue was plagued by bootleg albums and unauthorized re-releases of singles from his early pre-Columbia Records days. (Full list...)


May 28

Map of countries and territories with current and former Taiwanese diplomatic missions
Map of countries and territories with current and former Taiwanese diplomatic missions

Taiwan, officially the Republic of China, has 112 diplomatic missions across the world as of December 2020. Due to the One-China policy, other countries are only allowed to maintain relations with either Taiwan or the mainland-based People's Republic of China. As most countries have changed their recognition to the latter over time, only 17 of Taiwan's diplomatic missions have official status, consisting of fifteen embassies and two consulate-generals. Despite these barriers, 57 United Nations members maintain relations with Taiwan on an unofficial basis. To serve these locations and other places throughout the world, 92 semi-official representative offices are utilized for matters that would otherwise be handled by embassies or consulates. Taiwan has established informal representation in China's two special administrative regions as well. In Hong Kong, the Taipei Economic and Cultural Office in Hong Kong provides services similar to a consulate, while relations to Macau are handled by the Taipei Economic and Cultural Office in Macau. (Full list...)


May 31

Giacomo Agostini
Giacomo Agostini

The Grand Prix Road-Racing World Championship was established in 1949 by the sport's governing body, the Fédération Internationale de Motocyclisme (FIM), and is the oldest motorsport World Championship. Grand Prix motorcycle racing is the premier championship of motorcycle road racing, which has been divided into three classes since the 1990 season: 125cc, 250cc and MotoGP, with the addition of MotoE, an electric motorcycle class, in 2019. Classes that have been discontinued include 350cc and 50cc/80cc. Giacomo Agostini (pictured), with fifteen victories, has won the most world championships. Ángel Nieto is second with thirteen world championships and Valentino Rossi, Mike Hailwood and Carlo Ubbiali are third with nine world championships. Agostini holds the record for the most victories in the 500cc/MotoGP and 350cc classes with eight and seven world championships respectively. Phil Read and Max Biaggi have won the most 250cc/Moto2 championships, with four victories each. Nieto won the most championships in the 125cc and 50cc/80cc classes with seven and six victories respectively. (Full list...)

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